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Diversity

 

MCEDSV Commitment to Diversity and Traditionally Marginalized Communities

 

MCEDSV understands the importance of supporting leadership in diverse communities as a key element of the agency mission, philosophy, goals and strategic plan. All of MCEDSV programming and advocacy work is guided by this commitment. MCEDSV recognizes that multiple barriers exist that deny or limit access to quality domestic and sexual violence advocacy and services, especially for survivors from traditionally marginalized populations. Survivors of domestic and sexual violence, especially from communities of color, too often face profound challenges in seeking the quality and culturally competent advocacy, services and resources they need to be safe. MCEDSV is proud of its demonstrated track record promoting and nurturing leadership in linguistically, culturally, and community-relevant outreach and prevention services. Above all, MCEDSV promotes and supports indigenous leadership in communities of underrepresented groups, as they develop their own solutions to domestic and sexual violence.

 

MCEDSV has a profound understanding of the importance of engaging the community as the cornerstone to successfully building spaces where women are free from the threat of domestic and sexual violence. Further, MCEDSV understands the importance of supporting leadership in diverse communities as a key element of the agency mission, philosophy, goals and strategic plan. MCEDSV has been providing technical assistance for local collaborative efforts in culturally specific communities for many years. MCEDSV has worked throughout its history to build bridges of trust between the Coalition and communities of color, tribal entities, traditionally marginalized groups such as the Deaf, disability and LBGTIQ communities. Over the years, MCEDSV has refined its skills and capacity to support leaders of underrepresented groups who are defining the issue within their community and its impact in their community.

 

Metro-Detroit

 

Building the Safety Net Project

 

Since 2007, the BSN Project has provided unique efforts for capacity building with agencies whose primary purpose is to provide survivor centered direct services to victims of domestic and sexual assault in Detroit . At the core of the project is a skill building program that emphasizes leadership development, collaborative outreach, specialized training and technical assistance. BSN provides executive coaching and training to enhance knowledge and skills needed for successful delivery of high quality and culturally relevant services. This is achieved by strengthening the capacity of domestic violence service providers to provide quality advocacy, support and services to survivors from traditionally underserved communities in Detroit. Coaching has been successfully utilized in the BSN project as a means for strengthening domestic and sexual violence leadership. The BSN team implements interactive training and peer learning as well. A personally designed professional development plan for leadership teams at BSN partner agencies is also an essential element of the project's success.

 

National DELTA/DELTA FOCUS Project

 

MCEDSV was one of only fourteen states to receive funding for the Domestic Violence Prevention Enhancements and Leadership Through Alliances (DELTA) Project funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to strengthen state and local capacity for supporting primary prevention. MCEDSV is known nationally for its leadership in utilizing an intentional process to promote the needs of communities representing survivors from culturally specific communities as well as advancing the efforts of linguistically and culturally relevant prevention programming in its DELTA project. Three of the four original DELTA sub-grantees in Michigan represented culturally specific communities. DELTA programming in these communities is based on what the community identifies as its unique needs and what the community identifies as its unique strengths.

 

ACCESS

 

La Vida

 

New Visions: Alliance to End Violence in Asian/Asian American Communities

 

The relationships built between MCEDSV and the three DELTA culturally specific communities planted the seed for an organizational transformation to expand MCEDSV membership criteria to ensure that communities of color working in their own communities to end domestic violence through comprehensive social change efforts were included as primary members.

 

MCEDSV is now one of ten coalitions participating in the DELTA FOCUS project from CDC, and has continued this commitment to culturally specific work in selecting two of these three local communities to further develop and enhance their primary prevention efforts.  (ACCESS and LAVIDA)

 

 

Serving LBGTIQ Survivors

 

LBGTIQ & Allies

 

The MCEDSV LBGTIQ (lesbian, bisexual, gay, transgender, intersex, and queer or questioning) & Allies Task Forces has been active since the early 1980s. In the mid 1990's the Task Force developed a landmark training curriculum focusing on raising awareness of the needs of same sex survivors and decreasing homophobia in domestic violence programs. This highly successful training, which has been updated over the years, has been delivered to over 30 agencies, conferences and community partners across the state; educating over 1000 domestic and sexual service providers.  The training focuses on the effects of oppression on lesbian, gay, bisexual, intersex and transgender people, exploring similarities and differences between domestic and sexual violence experienced by LBGTIQ survivors and heterosexual survivors, and examining barriers and special consideration when working with LBGTIQ survivors.

 

 

Women of Color Task Force

 

The MCEDSV WOCTF is recognized throughout the state of Michigan and the nation as a leader in organizing and cultivating the leadership within underrepresented groups in the fields of domestic violence and sexual assault. The Task Force has a membership of over 150 women and is among the best organized and most influential in the nation. Michigan WOCTF leaders are often asked to speak to other states that have plans to build the capacity of their Task Forces.

 

Women of Color Task Force

 

 

Working with Incarcerated or Fomerly Incarcerated Survivors

 

The MCEDSV Open Doors Project was an innovative project funded by the Administration of Children and Families, Family Violence Prevention and Services Program.

 

To access the tool kit and for more information, please click here: 

Open Doors Toolkit

 

Parents, Friends, Family

Helping a Survivor of Assault

 

If You Know Someone Who Has Been Sexually Assaulted

 

Most people would agree that rape is one of the most traumatic experiences for anyone to endure. So how should you respond to someone you care about when they're trying to cope with the crisis of rape?

 

Unfortunately, there's no prescription or simple first aid procedure to follow. It's much more than knowing what to do or what to say. Your message must come from the heart.

 

Most crisis counselors would agree that one of the most significant factors in a rape survivor's recovery is how people around them respond at the time of disclosure. Recovery and emotional healing do not necessarily correspond to the degree of trauma. Rather, recovery is better determined by what happens to the rape victim in the aftermath of the crime. For example, someone who is blamed by others for the rape may face greater obstacles in recovery than someone who was fully believed and later validated by the criminal justice system with the successful prosecution of the assailant. Therefore, the most important thing you can do as a friend, lover or family member of a rape survivor is to believe them. There are other steps you can take to assist your friend in dealing with the rape. The following points have been summarized from the book, I Never Called It Rape, written by Robin Warshaw. They may offer you some guidance on what to do or say, however, your sensitivity and concern will make all the difference to the rape survivor.

 

If you know someone who has been sexually assaulted...Believe them! They're depending on you.

 

Listen to them. Let the person know you're available if they need you. However, resist the urge to ask details about what happened. The rape survivor will tell you what they want you to know when they're ready to talk about it.

 

Provide comfort and support in a way that is best suited for the survivor. Ask them if there is anything that you can do or get for them.

 

Let them know it wasn't their fault. Many rape victims feel guilty or blame themselves. Reinforce that they did not deserve what happened to them. The perpetrator is the one to blame.

 

Offer protection or a safe place to stay. You can also offer to stay at their home if that would be better for them. Remember, the choice is up to them.

 

Suggest calling a Rape Crisis Center. A rape crisis counselor can discuss the victim's options and needs. Most larger communities have a 24-hour Rape Crisis Center.Call the one nearest to your community.

 

Discuss with the rape victim the importance of a medical exam to treat medical needs and to address questions about sexually transmitted diseases or pregnancy. Many hospitals offer the morning-after pill for rape victims up to 72 hours after a rape.

 

Empower the rape victim to gain back control over their life. Allow them to make the decisions about what's best for them. Separate your feelings and needs from the rape victim's feelings and needs. It's important that you don't try to take control of the situation. Allow your friend to have control over their life right now.

 

Recognize that they may need some personal space and time before they resume sexual relations. Each survivor responds differently to the crisis. Some may not want to be touched or held for a while, yet others may want that closeness. It's okay for the rape survivor to cope with the trauma in whatever way is best for them.

 

Discuss their options – making a police report, getting counseling, having a medical exam. Offer your support – whatever their decision.

 

Be there for them in whatever way they need you – for a ride to the hospital, to spend the night, for a 2 a.m. phone call. Recovery from rape takes time – longer for some than others. Understand that they may not want to talk about it today, but they might need you several months from now.

 

Learn about rape trauma. Local Rape Crisis Centers have information available about rape and support services.

 

Recognize your own limits. Rape affects family and friends as well. It's okay to call the rape crisis center for your own needs. Rape is one of the most traumatic events anyone can endure. Family and friends aren't invulnerable to the pain of rape.

 

If someone you care about tells you they've been raped (whether it happened recently or several years ago) it's important to tell the survivor, "I'm sorry this happened to you. I'm here if you need me – anytime."

 

 

From A Handbook For Friends and Family of Sexual Assault Survivors published by MCEDSV.

 

 

Other Links

 

Learn more about sexual assault - From RAINN (Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network)

 

Help a loved one - From RAINN (Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network)

 

How Can a Parent Help in Domestic Violence?

 

How to Spot Signs of an Emotionally Abusive Relationship 

 

How to Help Your Child in an Abusive Relationship

 

How to Talk to Your Child if they are in an Abusive Relationship

 

How to Document Verbal & Emotional Abuse From a Spouse

 

Parents Are the Key to Ending Domestic Violence

 

Dating Abuse: What Every Parent Should Know

 

Michigan Bar Journal Domestic Violence Legal Remedies

 

Child Custody in Michigan

 

Fighting for Child Custody When Domestic Violence Is at Issue: Survey of State Laws

 

How Can I Help a Friend or Family Member Who is Being Abused?

 

If a Friend Is Involved in Domestic Violence...

Housing Protections Q & A for Survivors of Domestic or Sexual Violence

INTRODUCTION


In situations of domestic and sexual violence, one of the many problems is that the perpetrator may be in an intimate relationship with the survivor. This can create situations where the perpetrator and survivor are cohabitating, or are very familiar with each other's homes, lives and schedules, which can create the likelihood for further acts of violence or stalking. In order to ensure her safety and protection, the survivor may want to change her living situation.


Problems may arise if the survivor is in a contract such as a lease, and a less than sympathetic landlord demands the survivor to keep to the terms of the contract and continue paying rent. The landlord may also accidentally or purposefully reveal the survivor's new address to the abuser, or ignore a personal protection order. When in circumstances like these, the landlord's actions may actively deter the survivor from escaping an abusive household or relationship, which will continue to threaten her safety.


The following Q&A gives survivors of domestic and sexual violence, and victims of stalking an overview of some of the current laws that may help protect yourself and your rights in Michigan. Links have been provided to assist in correspondence with landlords, and further resources are provided that connect survivors with valuable legal and housing resources in Michigan.


QUESTION:


I am a domestic or sexual violence survivor, and housing is being denied to me because of this fact, or because I am a woman. Are there laws that protect me from this type of discrimination?

 

ANSWER:

 

Under Michigan Law...
The Elliot-Larsen Civil Rights Act states that it is illegal to discriminate in almost all housing situations on basis of race, color, religion, national origin, or, importantly to the domestic violence survivor, sex. Domestic and sexual violence survivors are statistically more likely to be women. The argument would be that the survivor is female, and the refusal to rent was based on her status as a female. Therefore, statistically speaking, the landlord's decision to not rent to survivors has a larger impact on females, which would demonstrate that the landlord's decision not to rent was motivated by discrimination against women, or at the very least disproportionately affects women.

 

Under Federal Law...
The Federal Fair Housing Act provides that housing shall not be denied to an individual based on gender. Domestic or sexual violence survivors are statistically more likely to be female. The plaintiff-tenant must show that the landlord discriminates against survivors, and therefore is disproportionately affecting women.
The Violence Against Women Act of 2005 (VAWA) also provides that public housing and private housing that receives federal funds cannot deny admission to a domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking survivor based on their history as a survivor.


Before a landlord honors VAWA, they can request proof of survivor status at their own discretion. In this event, the tenant has 14 business days to provide certified proof of their status as a survivor of domestic violence.

Sample Letter Claiming Protected Status Under VAWA 2005

 

QUESTION:


I am a survivor of domestic violence, sexual assault, or a victim of stalking, and I am being evicted from my housing because of these instances. Are there laws that protect me, and will allow me to continue living in my home?


ANSWER:


Under Federal Law...

The Violence Against Women Act of 2005 (VAWA) provides that public housing authorities and private landlords that accept federally-funded housing vouchers cannot evict a domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking survivor based on the charge of these crimes, unless the survivor-tenant is a danger to other tenants.


Before a landlord honors VAWA, they can request proof of survivor status at their own discretion. In this event, the tenant has 14 business days to provide certified proof of their status as a survivor of domestic violence.


Sample Letter Claiming Protected Status Under VAWA 2005

 

QUESTION:

 

I am a survivor of domestic and/or sexual violence, and fear for my safety if I continue to remain at my current residence. Are there laws that will allow me to break my lease agreement so I can move to protect my safety?


ANSWER:

 

Under Michigan Law...

The MCL 554.601b is an amendment to the Landlord-Tenant Act, and it allows domestic or sexual violence survivors the possibility of a release from a lease agreement without penalty if the survivor-tenant provides written notification and documentation of reasonable and present danger via certified mail.
Such documents include:
a. A valid personal protection order;
b. A probation, release, or parole order with a condition attached to protect the tenant;
c. A police report for any crime that occurred less than 14 days ago;
d. A police report with charges of domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking if the incident occurred more than 14 days ago; or
e. A report by a qualified third part, such as
a. A domestic violence or sexual assault counselor, a licensed health professional, a licensed mental health professional or a clergy member

In addition, after a release the landlord may not withhold the survivor-tenant's security deposit unless otherwise allowed. They may, however, keep any prepaid rent given prior to the survivor's vacating the premises.


Sample Letter for Claiming Rights Under MCL 554.601b


QUESTION:

 

I am a survivor of domestic violence, dating violence, or a victim of stalking, and currently live and share a lease with the abuser or stalker. I can no longer live with the abuser as it endangers my safety. Are there laws that protect me?

 

ANSWER:

 

Under Michigan Law...

The MCL 554.601b amendment to the Landlord-Tenant Act provides that if a survivor is granted release from their lease agreement based on their survivor status that the lease may also be bifurcated to permit any other tenants who want to remain in the lease to stay.
Under Federal Law...


The Violence Against Women Act of 2005 (VAWA) states that instances of domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking cannot count as a serious lease violation, a "good cause," or criminal activity against the survivor, but they may count as a serious lease violation, good cause, or criminal activity against the abuser. VAWA allows for the splitting of the lease so that the abuser who co-signed may be evicted for their abusive actions.


*Before a landlord honors VAWA, they can request proof of survivor status at their own discretion. In this event, the tenant has 14 business days to provide certified proof of their status as a survivor of domestic violence.

 

QUESTION:

 

Is my landlord obligated to honor a personal protection order?


ANSWER:

 

Under Federal Law...

The Violence Against Women Act of 2005 (VAWA) requires eligible landlords to honor all personal protection orders issued to the survivor-tenant of domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking.
*Before a landlord honors VAWA, they can request proof of survivor status at their own discretion. In this event, the tenant has 14 business days to provide certified proof of their status as a survivor of domestic violence.

 

QUESTION:

 

I am a survivor of domestic or sexual violence, and/or a victim of stalking. I want to keep my new address confidential. Is my landlord obligated to keep my forwarding address confidential?

 

ANSWER:

 

Under Michigan Law...

MCL 554.601b states that in the condition of a release from the lease agreement due to domestic or sexual violence, and/or stalking, the landlord cannot reveal the survivor's forwarding address or any other documentation unless for business or necessary purposes.

 

QUESTION:

 

What are examples of certified proof of domestic violence, dating violence or stalking under the Violence Against Women Act of 2005?

 

ANSWER:

 

Certified proof includes:
Certification from an attorney, a domestic violence service provider, or a medical professional;
A police record; or
A court record.

This proof must be provided within 14 business days, or the landlord is not required to treat the survivor as a survivor under VAWA.

 

Where to Go for More Information
For MCADSV's full report on Housing Protections for Survivors of Violence, click: Landlord Tenant Memo (Read Only)

 

Legal services and directories in Michigan:
Legal Aid Programs, click: http://www.michbar.org/public_resources/legalaid.cfm listed and supported by the State Bar of Michigan.

 

Michigan Legal Services Directory, click: http://www.michiganlegalaid.org/
Michigan Legal Aid provides a listing of all major legal aid programs in the state of Michigan as compiled by the University of Michigan College of Law, the State Bar of Michigan, the Michigan State Bar
Foundation, the Michigan Poverty Law Program, and the Legal Services Corporation.

 

Legal Documents:

 

Landlord-Tenant law publication by the MI Legislature, click: http://www.legislature.mi.gov/documents/publications/tenantlandlord.pdf lays out the general requirements and an overview of landlord-tenant law in Michigan. ( 2.20 MB)

 

MCL 554.601b text, click: http://legislature.mi.gov/doc.aspx?mcl-554-601b It includes the specific letter that must be provided by a qualified third-party in order for there to be certified proof as required by the statute.

 

Michigan State Housing Development Authority (Fair Housing page), click: http://michigan.gov/mshda/0,1607,7-141-5515_53192---,00.html includes numerous fair housing legal documents.
VAWA 2005 publication created by the American Bar Association, click: www.abanet.org/domviol/docs/VAWA2005forAttorneys.pdf, lays out an explanation of the requirements and changes created by VAWA 2005.

 

Fair Housing Centers in Michigan

 

Fair Housing Center of Southeastern Michigan, click: http://www.fhcswm.org/services

 

Fair Housing Center of Western Michigan, click: http://www.fhcwm.org/

 

Many Legal Services Programs throughout Michigan provide legal support and counsel in you have received unfair housing treatment because of race, sex, color, religion, national origin, age, familial marital, or handicap status, and you are a resident of the county the program serves.

 

Find your local program - Michigan Legal Services Directory, click: http://www.michiganlegalaid.org/

 

HUD's Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity Program Office, click: http://www.hud.gov/local/mi/working/localpo/fheo.cfm, investigates any claims arising out of alleged violations of federal civil rights laws by groups funded by HUD.

 

For the Detroit office, please contact the following location: Yvonne Poindexter, Director, (313) 226-7900 ext. 8013, for the hearing impaired: (313) 226-7900 ext. 6899.
Michigan Tenant Counseling Program, click: http://www.michigantenants.org/

 

National Housing Information:

 

ACLU, Violence Against Women: Housing, click: http://www.aclu.org/womens-rights/violence-against-women-housing

 

Legal Momentum, Employment and Housing Rights for Victims of Domestic Violence, click: http://www.legalmomentum.org/legal-knowledge/publications/employment-and-housing-rights.html includes valuable information for survivors of domestic violence in housing and employment matters.

 

National Network to End Domestic Violence, Housing, click: http://www.nnedv.org/policy/issues/housing.html

 

Informational Websites:

 

Legal Momentum, click: http://www.legalmomentum.org/

 

National Housing Law Project, click: http://nhlp.org/help

 

National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty, click: http://nlchp.org/program.cfm?prog=3

 

Note: Websites last accessed on November 1, 2011.

 

Information sourced from: Matthew Sherman, JD Research Attorney, MCADSV. Webinar, April 2011. "Housing Protections for Survivors of Violence." Michigan Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault. Okemos, MI.

What Does the "A" in LBGTIQ/A Really Stand For?

By Kelly Schweda, former LBGTIQ & Allies Task Force Planning Committee Member

 

Allies have played an important role in the history of many social justice movements. They work to end oppression and make positive, compassionate changes within the dominant cultures. It is easy to declare yourself an ally to LBGTIQ communities. However, really defining the role of being an ally and how we can fulfill that role can be a more difficult task.

 

In a recent discussion, the LBGTIQ/A task force tried to define and recognize the role and importance of allies to the community. We found several common ideas:

 

  • Allies educate themselves on the culture of the community.
  • Despite allies being outside of the community they remain supportive.
  • Allies are always working on being mindful of their own privileges. They are willing to confront not only their own prejudices, but the prejudices they encounter from others.
  • Allies have a compassionate listening ear. They strive to be open-minded.
  • Allies can educate the public on the needs of the community.
  • Allies can help keep the issues relative to LBGTIQ communities "on the table" constantly as they interact with the majority community.
  • Allies remain supportive in their public and private lives.
  • Allies are willing to recognize and learn from their mistakes.

 

When exploring your own role as an ally, it is important to look at your own personal prejudices that may inhibit your full support to LBGTIQ communities. Many times, these barriers and prejudices can prevent us from becoming compassionate and open-minded. Some personal areas to explore include:

 

  • Fear of offending someone from the community you are trying to support.
  • Not recognizing your own privilege as a member of the majority. Being oblivious to the many ways LBGTIQ communities are marginalized.
  • Not growing or working through your own biases and emotions regarding these issues.
  • Not knowing anyone within the community you are trying to support.
  • Being fearful that people will label you as LBGTIQ if you are seen supporting their cause(s).

 

When faced with these barriers, it is important to reflect on your values and commitment to equality:

  • Maintain a core belief that people should be treated with equal dignity and respect is key to becoming an ally. If you remain open and respectful, even if you make a mistake, it can be used to help you grow and become more self-aware.
  • Recognize your personal experience with the communities you are trying to support. Many allies begin with supporting a friend or loved one.
  • Educate yourself on the myths and facts of the communities you are trying to support. This knowledge will assist you in confronting prejudices and misconceptions that the LBGTIQ communities face.
  • Commit to being an ally. Remain open, honest and willing to talk and listen.

 

As an ally, I know I will make mistakes. However, I also know that I am part of bigger movement to end oppression. So, the "A" in LBGTIQ/A belongs exactly where it is. Right along side the community allies strive to support.

 

 

What does the “A” in LBGTIQ/A really stand for?

 

By Kelly Schweda, LBGTIQ & Allies Task Force Planning Committee Member

 

Allies have played an important role in the history of many social justice movements. They work to end oppression and make positive, compassionate changes within the dominant cultures. It is easy to declare yourself an ally to LBGTIQ communities. However, really defining the role of being an ally and how we can fulfill that role can be a more difficult task.

 

In a recent discussion, the LBGTIQ/A task force tried to define and recognize the role and importance of allies to the community. We found several common ideas:

 

- Allies educate themselves on the culture of the community.

- Despite allies being outside of the community they remain supportive.

- Allies are always working on being mindful of their own privileges. They

  are willing to confront not only their own prejudices, but the prejudices

  they encounter from others.

- Allies have a compassionate listening ear. They strive to be open-minded.

- Allies can educate the public on the needs of the community.

- Allies can help keep the issues relative to LBGTIQ communities “on the

  table” constantly as they interact with the majority community.

- Allies remain supportive in their public and private lives.

- Allies are willing to recognize and learn from their mistakes.

 

When exploring your own role as an ally, it is important to look at your own personal prejudices that may inhibit your full support to LBGTIQ communities. Many times, these barriers and prejudices can prevent us from becoming compassionate and open-minded. Some personal areas to explore include:

 

- Fear of offending someone from the community you are trying to support.

- Not recognizing your own privilege as a member of the majority. Being

  oblivious to the many ways LBGTIQ communities are marginalized.

- Not growing or working through your own biases and emotions regarding

  these issues.

- Not knowing anyone within the community you are trying to support.

- Being fearful that people will label you as LBGTIQ if you are seen

  supporting their cause(s).

 

 

 

When faced with these barriers, it is important to reflect on your values and commitment to equality:

 

- Maintain a core belief that people should be treated with equal dignity and

  respect is key to becoming an ally. If you remain open and respectful,

  even if you make a mistake, it can be used to help you grow and become

  more self-aware.

- Recognize your personal experience with the communities you are trying

  to support. Many allies begin with supporting a friend or loved one.

- Educate yourself on the myths and facts of the communities you are

  trying to support. This knowledge will assist you in confronting prejudices

  and misconceptions that the LBGTIQ communities face.

- Commit to being an ally. Remain open, honest and willing to talk and

  listen.

 

As an ally, I know I will make mistakes. However, I also know that I am part of bigger movement to end oppression. So, the “A” in LBGTIQ/A belongs exactly where it is. Right along side the community allies strive to support.

Websites for Faith Communities

Section 1 - National Websites

(Note: this list is not all inclusive)


The following are informational websites that specifically address involvement of the faith community in the issue of domestic and sexual violence:

 

AARDVARC, An Abuse, Rape and Domestic Violence Aid and Resource Collection http://www.aardvarc.org/dv/religion.shtml
includes a wonderful link on their site, which provides many free informational resources dealing with religion and domestic violence.

 

Faith Trust Institute http://www.faithtrustinstitute.org/ is the premiere groundbreaking organization exploring the intersection of faith and domestic and sexual violence. Founded in 1977, they are an international, multifaith organization who's motto is working together to end domestic and sexual violence. They offer a wealth of excellent resources.

 

Jewish Women International (JWI) http://www.jewishwomen.org/ is dedicated to ensuring that every woman and girl is safe, in her home and in her relationships. JWI is recognized as the leading Jewish organization committed to ending the cycle of family violence.

 

Peace and Safety in the Christian Home http://www.peaceandsafety.com/ is a loose coalition of academics, professionals, clergy and laypeople who are alarmed by domestic violence in the Christian home are interested in solving the problem of abuse in the Christian home.

 

The Black Church and Domestic Violence Institute http://www.bcdvi.org/index.htm is diverse group of people who are concerned about the issues of domestic violence in families and in all human relationships and the response of the Black Church.

 

The Islamic Society of North America's (ISNA) Domestic Violence Forum http://www.isna.net/Services/pages/Domestic-Violence-Forum.aspx was established to bring awareness to the issue of domestic violence in Muslim communities and provide opportunities for collaboration, exchanges of information and the promotion of continued research in the field of the impact of domestic violence on Muslim families.

 

The National Online Resource Center on Violence Against Women http://www.vawnet.org/category/Documents.php?docid=864&category_id=611 contains 2 sections within the website at www.vawnet.org with information for faith-based communities. One is a list of resources on domestic violence prevention and education in faith-based communities which may be found at http://new.vawnet.org/category/Main_Doc.php?docid=837. Also an
article: "Religion & Domestic Violence: Information and Resources - Key Issue: Interpretations of Religious Doctrine" and links to some related articles may befound at:

 

 

Section 2 - Michigan-based sites

 

Burgess Family Ministry and Consultation Service This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. is located in Kalamazoo. Executive Director John P. Burgess is an ordained elder in the Free Methodist Church. In addition to providing counseling and batterer intervention services, John is passionate about working with churches to increase awareness and response to issues surrounding violence against women. He has lead many educational programs for church leaders and congregations including programs for teens regarding healthy relationships. He can be reached at the email address above.

 

 Safe Haven Ministries http://www.safehavenministries.org/ is a Grand Rapids-based, comprehensive domestic violence organization, and the only faith-based organization in the nation to exclusively provide domestic violence services. Its mission is "Motivated by Christ’s love, our mission is to end domestic abuse." In serving women and children, Safe Haven offers an emergency shelter, non-residential services, including case management, counseling, and a trauma-intervention children’s program, as well as a prevention and education program for the entire community. Safe Haven’s resources, including those specifically designed for the faith community, can be accessed by all on its website.

 

Section 3 - National General Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Resources

 

The following are general websites, not specifically focused on the faith community, which provide information and address community involvement in the issue of domestic and sexual violence.

 

Stop It Now! http://www.stopitnow.com/ has been active since1992. Their focus is public policy, public education, and research programs to protect our children by emphasizing adult and community responsibility.

 

The Asian & Pacific Islander Institute on Domestic Violence http://www.apiahf.org/index.php/programs/domestic-violence.html serves as a forum for, and clearinghouse on information, research, resources and critical issues about violence against women in Asian and Pacific Islander communities.

 

The Family Violence Prevention Fund http://www.endabuse.org/ works to prevent violence within the home, and in the community, to help those whose lives are devastated by violence.

 

The Institute on Domestic Violence in the African American Community http://www.dvinstitute.org/ provides leadership to end/reduce domestic violence in the African American Community.

 

The Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network (RAINN) http://www.rainn.org/ is the nation's largest anti-sexual assault organization. RAINN operates the National Sexual Assault Hotline and carries out programs to prevent sexual assault, help victims and ensure that rapists are brought to justice.

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